British English: loosing of sophistication

If linguists of the 19th century were looking for the mother tongue while using  sophisticated constructions, idioms and collocations, the XXI century generation has closed these researches, having created its own mother tongue based on simplicity and tendency to a general language degradation. This problem touches any language more or less spread worldwide, but British English suffers much more.

American expansion, tendencies to the global union, the priority of English in front of other languages do their part. Everybody speaks English and as a result each nation brings its own view of the language into it. In fact, Modern English is a huge monster full of many kinds of words, grammar versions and varieties of pronunciation. People don’t care much of English quality as it is well-known that any way of speaking is acceptable. Besides the absence of strict standards for foreigners makes a serious problem, first of all, for British English. It has quite negative impact of anyhow speaking and as a result beautiful and sophisticated phrases and collocations disappear among simple, often used words.

The way we speak reflects plenty of things. It shows our enlightenment, culture and education. Moreover the language is a treasure of the centuries. It’s the only connection we have with our ancestors. It’s extremely sad to watch us wasting all this hoping to substitute sophistication for primitive, disposable expressions. Whatever pretty they’re, any kind of simplicity demonstrates the society decadence and ignorance.

Maria KethuProfumo

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